The Bahamas Weekly Facebook The Bahamas Weekly Twitter
News : International Last Updated: May 7, 2015 - 7:57:38 AM

Op-Ed: Why Women Are Central to U.S. Foreign Policy by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
By U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
Mar 6, 2013 - 2:20:31 PM

Email this article
 Mobile friendly page
During my first week as the United States’  Secretary of State, I had the honor of meeting with a group of courageous women from Burma.   Two were former political prisoners, and although they had all endured incredible hardship in their lives, each of them was committed to moving forward - providing education and training to girls, finding jobs for the unemployed and advocating for greater participation in civil society.  I have no doubt that they will continue to be powerful agents of change, bringing progress to their communities and their country in the years to come.

It’s opportunities like this that remind us why it is so vital that the United States continues to work with governments, organizations and individuals around the world to protect and advance the rights of women and girls.  After all, just like in our own country, the world's most pressing economic, social and political problems simply cannot be solved without the full participation of women. 

According to the World Economic Forum, countries where men and women are closer to enjoying equal rights are far more economically competitive than those where the gender gap has left women and girls with limited or no access to medical care, education, elected office, and the marketplace.   Similarly, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that if women farmers had the same access to seeds, fertilizer, and technology as men do, they could reduce the number of undernourished people in the world by 100 million to 150 million. 

Yet in too many societies and too many homes, women and girls are still undervalued, denied opportunities to go to school, and forced to marry as children.   Too many lives have been lost or altered forever by gender-based violence.  As the father of two daughters, I cannot imagine the pain suffered by the parents of the young woman known as “Nirbhaya,” the 23-year old medical student murdered on a New Delhi bus simply for being a woman, or the anguish felt by the parents of Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl shot by extremists as she too rode on a bus, simply for wanting to go to school.  But I am inspired by Malala’s undaunted commitment to her cause, by Nirbhaya’s determination, while dying, to bring her assailants to justice, and by their fathers’ courage in speaking out on behalf of their daughters and women everywhere.

No country can get ahead if it leaves half of its people behind. This is why the United States believes gender equality is critical to our shared goals of prosperity, stability, and peace, and why investing in women and girls worldwide is critical to advancing U.S. foreign policy.

We invest in the training and mentoring of women entrepreneurs so they can not only lift up their own families, but also help their countries’ economies grow.   We invest in girls’ education so that they can escape forced early marriage, break the cycle of poverty, and develop into community leaders and engaged citizens.   Increasing girls’ and women’s education and their access to resources also improves the health and education of the next generation.

We work with partners around the world to boost maternal health, strengthen female farmers, and prevent and address gender-based violence because all societies benefit when women are healthy, safe, and can contribute their labor, leadership and creativity to the global economy.  U.S. diplomats everywhere work to integrate women fully into peace negotiations and security efforts because bringing women’s experiences, concerns and insights to the table can help prevent future conflict and build more lasting peace.

Today, International Women’s Day, is a day of celebration.  It is also a day when each of us must recommit to ending the inequality that prevents progress in every corner of the globe. We can and we must commit to this so that each of our daughters can ride the bus to school without fear, all of our sisters can fulfill their tremendous potential, and every woman and girl can live up to her full potential.

Bookmark and Share

© Copyright 2013 by thebahamasweekly.com

Top of Page

Receive our Top Stories

Preview | Powered by CommandBlast

Latest Headlines
Sandals takes a stab at the Aedes Aegypti Mosquito in schools
State of the world’s youth population: New index underscores urgent need to invest in young people
Royal Commonwealth Society statement on Maldives leaving the Commonwealth
New Attorney General Commits to Improving Productivity and Creating Synergy
Miss Grand Bahamas a favourite at Miss Grand International Pageant in Vegas
Health leaders discuss action against mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika and dengue
Submissions call for prestigious Commonwealth education awards
NASA, Citizen Scientists Discover Potential New Hunting Ground for Exoplanets
CARICOM Sends Emergency Relief Supplies to Haiti post Hurricane Matthew 2016
Bahamas attends Sixth Annual Caribbean-United States Security Cooperation Dialogue
Guests Enjoy “A Night In The Bahamas” at Washington Embassy
Stuart Florida assists The Bahamas with Hurricane Relief
Building an Energy Efficient Private Sector
Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association Supports Haiti / Bahamas Hurricane Relief
Baleària Carribean provides relief supplies to mitigate the effects of Hurricane
Statement of the General Secretariat on the Electoral Process in Nicaragua
Hurricane Relief Accounts set up for Bahamians and Friends of The Bahamas in Canada wishing to assist
CARICOM to support relief and recovery efforts in Haiti and The Bahamas post Hurricane Matthew
Regional Nurses Start Specialised Training At Uwi, Trinidad Thanks TO CIBC FirstCaribbena
Atlantic Storm System Delays NASA Resupply Launch to Space Station
High level delegation undertakes mission to Haiti and the Bahamas in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew
An understanding to help small Commonwealth states get access to global markets is signed off
Peace Process in Colombia: Statement from the OAS Secretary General
Support to Civil Protection Directorate in Haiti post Hurricane Matthew
Ambassador Newry meets with Office Of Caribbean Affairs
Bahamas Defence Force vessels en-route home with supplies from Key West
OAS holds meeting on Hurricane Matthew
As Haiti assesses hurricane damage, PAHO’s emergency response targets cholera
Florida Keys providing recovery assistance to The Bahamas
Pinder and Diedrick call on Ambassador Newry in Washington
CDEMA deploys response teams to Haiti and The Bahamas following impact of Hurricane Matthew
PAHO Responds to Hurricane Matthew Emergency in Caribbean, prepares for cholera upsurge in Haiti
MAPP/OAS Urges Colombians to Continue the Search for Peace
Hurricane Matthew: Secretary-General urges ‘solidarity and renewed resolve’
France and St.Lucia Sign Agreements
Jamaica's NMIA aiport to reopen today at 12 noon
Rahming delivers CARICOM statement at U.N.
OAS Secretary General Calls on Member States to Strengthen the Inter-American Human Rights System
Bahamas and Republic of Turkey Sign Air-Service Agreement
Bahamian named Caribbean Hotelier of the Year